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Updated 8 August 2001

Learn about the latest research on Gulf War veterans illnesses at the 2001 Gulf War Veterans Conference in Atlanta, GA.

Speakers to include experts on all areas of Gulf War veterans' exposures, as well as special keynote speaker H. Ross Perot.  October 5-7, Atlanta, GA.

Conference information and registration.



This page is intended to provide information to Gulf War veterans concerned with exposure to DU during our service in the Gulf War.

"The Army conservatively treats its tank crews and maintenance personnel as members of the general public with respect to radiation exposure. This means, under the current exposure limits specified by the NRC at 10 CFR 20.1301, that the Army must assure that individual crew members are not exposed to radiation fields in excess of 0.002 rem in any one hour and no more than 0.1 rem in any one year."---Technical Report, Environmental Assessment Of the Abrams Heavy Armor System April 1998

DOD Munitions containing DU at Seneca Army Depot and other areas
7.62 mm
.50 caliber
20mm MK149 70 grams - .15lbs.
25mm PGU-20 148 grams - .32lbs.
25mm M919 97 grams - .21lbs.
30mm PGU-14 298 grams - .66lbs.
105mm M774 3364 grams - 7.41lbs.
105mm M833 3668 grams - 8.08lbs
120mm
155mm Special Artillery
Various
missile components

Pictures and news article of deformities in children in Iraq related to DU exposure

These are VERY graphic photos. Please use discretion!

Pictures and news article of deformities in children in Iraq related to DU exposure

NATO's Area of Depleted Uranium Expenditure Map in Kosovo

This map was released showing where depleted uranium was used by NATO in the recent Operation Allied Force. A quote from the attached letter:

"DU Rounds were used whenever the A-10 engaged armour during Operation Allied Force. Therefore, it was used throughout Kosovo during approximately 100 missions."

NATO's Area of Depleted Uranium Expenditure Map in Kosovo

DOD's Area of Depleted Uranium Expenditure Map

This map was released by the Office of the Special Assistant for Gulf War Illnesses (Bernard Rostker, Under Secretary of the Army) to the Presidential Special Oversight Board (former Senator Warren Rudman) on November 19, 1998 in Washington, DC.

DOD's Area of Depleted Uranium Expenditure Map

DU Training Videos

These videos are of the training the DOD has had since 1995 on avoiding depleted uranium hazards, yet they are not being used. They were obtained and put into RealVideo format by the Military Toxics Project. Each Video is quite large, but is in streaming video format so by clicking on the link, your RealMedia player should open and begin playing the video.  These videos require the Real Player.  If you don't have it, click below to get it.

Video One    Video Two    Video Three

Get Real Player here Get the RealPlayer

DU Training Videos

DU Training

DU Training for military medical personnel Video Clip

This is training material that on April 15, 1999 OSAGWI stated was unavailable to military medical personnel. Bernard Rostker has previously stated that Col. Eric Daxon is "the Army's expert on DU". He is the individual speaking in the medical training video.
If you use Netscape, right click on the above link and choose "Save Link As" to download the clip to your
harddrive for easier viewing.

DU Training for military medical personnel Video Clip

Navy Memo dated September 1998 on training personnel on the hazards of DU.

Please read this message dated September 1998. Note that the Navy still does not have material specific to the Navy.

Navy Memo dated September 1998 on training personnel on the hazards of DU.

Orders from TRADOC Commander for DU Training

Check out the training orders issued by TRADOC to begin training on the hazards of Depleted Uranium.
Also, NOTE the dates of the orders when you view the documents. One, with the date somewhat smudged, shows the order was issued 19 Jul 1996. The other, essentially the same order, was issued 15 August 1997. A few days prior to my FOIA, and within days of significant media attention.
A few questions:
What has taken so long for these orders to be issued?
Is the DOD normally in the habit of issuing essentially the same orders more than once?

Orders from TRADOC Commander for DU Training
245Kb of GIF images in Zip format

DepSecDef John Hamre Letter to Service Chiefs on Training

Check out this letter by DepSecDef John Hamre. This letter was issued in early 1998 to the Service Chiefs trying to get them to implement DU Training......training that still is not available to soldiers. One would think if the letters were not downplaying the hazards of DU exposure the Services would take the training more seriously and implement it.

The Secretary of Defense should mandate DU training for ALL military personnel with the same emphasis as the Anthrax Vaccination Program.

DepSecDef John Hamre Letter to Service Chiefs on Training

Special Assistant Letter to Service Chiefs on DU Training

This sounds like a broken record. This letter was issued in late 1997 to the Service Chiefs trying to get them to implement DU Training......training that still is not available to soldiers. One would think if the letters were not downplaying the hazards of DU exposure the Services would take the training more seriously and implement it.

The Secretary of Defense should mandate DU training for ALL military personnel with the same emphasis as the Anthrax Vaccination Program. Show some leadership!

Special Assistant Letter to Service Chiefs on DU Training

DU Hazard Awareness Training (Tier 1) Available April 1995

This training material along with associated videos were available in 1995, yet the DOD is still not implementing the training. The Navy has made no attempt to develope training specific to the Navy, but at least is proactive enough to use what is available. OSAGWI states there is no material available for military medical personnel, even though "the Army's expert on DU" is the featured speaker in this December 1998 video.

DU Hazard Awareness Training (Tier 1) Available April 1995

DU Medical

U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion & Preventive Medicine
Medical NBC Battlebook (3.4M in PDF)

This book is incredible since it includes a lot of information contradictory to many DOD and VA statements regarding Depleted Uranium. It admits the kidney has the ability to repair itself after DU exposure, which proves the DOD and VA have knowingly and wrongly focused on the kidney. It also suggests the VA method for testing samples is not sensitive enough since it suggests using Mass Spectrometry to test samples. How accurate can the Institute of Medicine report be when they only look at DOD and VA assurances that DU exposure is not harmful?

U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion & Preventive Medicine
Medical NBC Battlebook (3.4M in PDF)

Air Force Personnel Exposure to DU dust

This is an instance of an Air Force member who has been exposed to DU dust from chiseling DU used in an aircraft. Perhaps if the Depleted Uranium training had been taking place, this exposure would not have happened.
This exposure warranted a report to the NRC for dust created by chiseling. This amount of dust is a bit lower than the 293,000,000 grams of dust created during the Gulf War.

Air Force Personnel Exposure to DU dust

Management of Depleted Uranium Casualties

Continuing Medical Education (CME) for Physicians
Videotape for CME Enduring Materiel
Original Release Date: 3 December 1998
Expiration Date: 2 December 1999
Estimated Time to Complete This Educational Activity: 1 Hour

Although this is not the actual video tape, I have requested the available training though FOIA. It is interesting to note that this training was available as of December 1998, but OSAGWI stated in April when the RAND report was released that there was no training material available for military medical personnel.
It is also interesting to note that the below memo from LTG Ron Blanck was not issued until I submitted the FOIA for the material.

Management of Depleted Uranium Casualties
in Rich Text Format

MEMORANDUM FOR COMMANDERS, MEDCOM MAJOR SUBORDINATE COMMANDS
SUBJECT: Policy for the Treatment of Personnel Wounded by Depleted Uranium Munitions

This memo, written by LTG Ron Blanck on 9 April 1999, is interesting in that it was issued 4 months after the training material was available. On 15 April, OSAGWI stated there was no training material available for military medical personnel. This video clip is from a part of the training material that was available as of December 1998.

MEMORANDUM FOR COMMANDERS, MEDCOM MAJOR SUBORDINATE COMMANDS
in Rich Text Format

AFRRI Briefing, Health Effects of Depleted Uranium

Please view the Health Effects of depleted uranium, as found by the DOD's Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI). This information shows that DU transforms cells into tumorigenic phenotype, is mutagenic, induces genetic instability and induces Oncogenes, suggesting carcinogenicity. AFRRI's conclusion: "Strong evidence exists to support detailed study of DU carcinogenicity."

AFRRI Briefing, Health Effects of Depleted Uranium

DU Protocol

Please download this VA Protocol to be tested for DU contamination. Take it with you when you request the VA provide this test. There are phone numbers within the protocol for your doctor to call to request the test, or more information including a questionaire.

DU Protocol
in Rich Text Format

Gulf War Expert Scientific Committee Meeting Minutes

The below Gulf War Expert Scientific Committee Meeting Minutes are full of information on DU, MCS, Leishmaniasis, as well as information on other toxic exposures.

Please note the date this meeting was held, November 17 and 18, 1997.

The health effects of those known to have been exposed to DU were WELL KNOWN 10 months prior to Bernard Rostker's release of the Environmental Exposure Report on Depleted Uranium in August 1998, yet they chose to ignore these health effects, and continue to downplay, excuse, mislead and burden veterans concerning our exposures to Depleted Uranium before, during and after the Gulf War.
These minutes also show some currently portraying themselves as veterans advocates were very knowledgeable about these health effects, yet they choose to support the DoD's report and downplay the KNOWN health effects to veterans and the public.
The Environmental Exposure report is still on GulfLink......it should have been pulled months ago with an explanation that a more-thorough, factual investigation would take place by an outside agency with a new report to be posted within 6 months.

Gulf War Expert Scientific Committee
Meeting Minutes
from November 1997

2.55Mb of GIF images in Zip format

Medically Significant Health Effects

Please view transcripts of medically significant health effects that were related in a VA DU Teleconference in March 1998.....5 months prior to the release of OSAGWI's Environmental Exposure report on DU. These same health effects were also presented at our national conference in Washington, DC in September 1998. Why do veterans still have so much trouble getting tested for DU contamination? Why were regulations changed in June 1995 to exclude soldiers from medical care, and having their records noted as recommended by the Institute of Medicine?
These health effects have been KNOWN since at least November 1997. Bernard Rostker states they did not include these findings in their DU report since they have yet to be published. It is now 1999, how much longer do veterans have to wait for these to be published before proper medical care is provided?

Medically Significant Health Effects

Lead Report from GulfLink

This Lead Report is posted in the End Notes section of OSAGWI's Environmental Exposure report on DU. It is sad to read this and other Lead Reports showing that soldiers enrolled in the VA's DU Program in Baltimore have been tested in this program on two occasions, rather than "followed very closely" as if widely stated by DOD and VA.

Lead Report from GulfLink

Institute of Medicine report on
Potential Radiation Exposure in Military Operations
Protecting the Soldier Before, During, and After

This report, by the Institute of Medicine recommended to the DOD in 1996 that soldiers potentially exposed to radiation on the battlefield be trained, have their medical records noted, and the exposure be reported. Why are only convenient reports cited by the DOD concerning radiation exposure to soldiers?

Institute of Medicine report on
Potential Radiation Exposure in Military Operations
Protecting the Soldier Before, During, and After

DU Reports

DOD Chemical and Biological Defense Program
March 2000 Annual Report to Congress
full report in PDF format


Some excerpts from the report, 

ISSUE Radiation exposures below a level that cause acute effects predispose military personnel to injury from other battlefield agents. The magnitude of this interaction has not been fully evaluated.

SOLUTION Preliminary studies show that a sublethal dose of radiation causes 100% mortality when given to an animal exposed to a 40%-lethal dose of B. anthracis spores (anthrax). Furthermore, sublethal doses of radiation can abrogate by approximately 20% protective immunity against anthrax in vaccinated animals. Data is being developed in animal models across the spectrum of combined doses and B. anthracis, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus or blistering agents that can be expected under operational scenarios. The data is subjected to standardized algorithmic analysis in order to extrapolate the consequences of combined exposures in humans and to build casualty prediction models.

Protracted low-dose radiation refers to the deposition of low-energy radiation energy in biological tissues over extended periods of time. Sources of low-energy radiation include fall-out from nuclear weapon detonations, radiological dissemination devices, and any other source of environmental radiation contamination. Health consequences are generally intermediate to long-term and result from cumulative tissue injury accruing over time due to chronic exposure. Health consequences can be exacerbated further when radionuclides are deposited internally by ingestion, inhalation or through open wounds in the external integument.

Combined ionizing radiation and either chemical or biological agents refers to the amplified health consequences when chemical or biological insults are incurred in conjunction with radiological injury. Both clinical and non-clinical exposures to ionizing radiation compromise host defenses against a variety other stressors, including infectious agents and chemical toxicants. Exposures to doses of radiation and infectious or chemical agents that are by them selves sublethal can produce mortality rates of nearly 100% when combined.

DOD Chemical and Biological Defense Program
March 2000 Annual Report to Congress
full report in PDF format 

Letter from Producer of 60 Minutes

This is a letter from 60 Minutes Producer Peter Klein to Dan Fahey, writer of many of the great reports posted to this web site. The letter shows the DOD should have been paying attention to what Dan has said and written on Depleted Uranium rather than trying to discredit him. I wonder what the Pentagon "experts on DU" think?

Letter from Producer of 60 Minutes

Don't Look, Don't Find

Another VERY thorough report by Dan Fahey on Depleted Uranium. Includes many comments on health effects and current research information, and how several investigative bodies (PSOB, OSAGWI, PAC, SIU, etc) failed miserably to thoroughly investigate depleted uranium exposures. Also includes comments and the maop of the latest spreading of radioactive toxic waste in Kosovo.

Don't Look, Don't Find

DU Counterweights used in Aircraft

This is a report from the FAA detailing where depleted uranium is used as counterweights in aircraft. The report includes a picture of the aircraft showing where the weights are located. It also shows what training is provided to workers in regard to the hazard.

DU Counterweights used in Aircraft

An Assessment of External Interest in Depleted Uranium Use by the US Military (DRAFT) in PDF Format

A very interesting report. The DoD, in what appears to be an attempt to determine which direction opposition would come from on Depleted Uranium use, contracted with an organization to survey individuals and organizations for their comments on Depleted Uranium.
This report is a Draft, below is the Final. When comparing the two reports, one can see the abuse of the FOIA and Privacy Act by the Department of Defense. In the Final Report, damaging comments on health effects of DU exposure by large veterans organizations were redacted.
It is interesting to note the comments from the American Legion at the time of this report, (September 1994) and their current open proponency and support of the DoD on Depleted Uranium. The American Legion Gulf War Task Force has abandoned Gulf War veterans in regard to DU exposures.
The Legion, DoD, PSOB, and PAC CANNOT point to ANY medical research on veterans showing the health effects of DU exposure. In fact, their opposition to research is in direct opposition to calls by RAND, AFRRI and the VA for further medical research!
Considering we have been finding reports written as early as 1963 that Depleted Uranium could possibly contain Plutonium, and the knowledge of this by Roger Kaplan of the PSOB and Togo West of the VA, greatly increases the need for medical research to determine the health effects in veterans from exposure to DU.

An Assessment of External Interest in Depleted Uranium Use by the US Military (DRAFT) in PDF Format

AEPI: Public Interest Groups and Depleted Uranium (Final) in PDF format

This is the Final Report on External Interest in Depleted Uranium by individuals and organizations. Again, please note the redaction of comments on health effects of Depleted uranium made by large veterans organizations.

AEPI: Public Interest Groups and Depleted Uranium (Final) in PDF format

Message on use of Depleted Uranium rounds off Torishima Island in Japan
provided by Paul Lyons of the Persian Gulf Information Network

This message shows some detail on the use of Depleted Uranium rounds off Torishima Island in Japan in December 1995 and again in January 1996. The use of the rounds was discovered at Kadena AFB after rounds had jammed in a Harrier gun.

Message on use of Depleted Uranium rounds off Torishima Island in Japan
provided by Paul Lyons of the Persian Gulf Information Network

Potential Non-Nuclear Uses for Depleted Uranium January 28, 1960
from Dan Fahey

This report shows that as early as 1960 there were attempts to find many uses for Depleted Uranium. Towards the end of the report is information on health and safety hazards on depleted uranium, including information on the effects of inhalation and ingestion.

Potential Non-Nuclear Uses for Depleted Uranium January 28, 1960
from Dan Fahey

Uranium Metal Potential for Discovering Commercial Uses
Steven M. Baker, Ph. D.
Knoxville TN
5 August 1998

This report doesn't hold back anything in trying to get rid of Depleted Uranium. Some quotes from the report:

"Need Commercial Uses for Inventory"
   
"Avoid Disposal Cost"
"Market will Come if Story is Told"
"Common Impression"
    "Material Properties Must be Like Lead’s"
"Nothing Could be Farther From the Truth"
"Could be a Significant Benefit to Society"

Uranium Metal Potential for Discovering Commercial Uses
Steven M. Baker, Ph. D.
Knoxville TN
5 August 1998

DARCOM Safety Manual on Handling Depleted Uranium 385-1.1-78
in PDF Format

The files below make up part of the DARCOM (Defense and Readiness Command) Safety Manual on Handling Depleted Uranium.

A couple quotes from the manual:

“Moderately severe damage to the kidney as a result of acute exposure is repairable, and a return to normal kidney function may occur even during continued exposure.”

 

“The use of urine excreta data alone to evaluate uptakes of DU is not recommended since it is extremely difficult or virtually impossible to make acceptable estimates of lung burden from urinalysis alone.”

DARCOM Safety Manual Chapters 4 and 5
DARCOM Safety Manual Chapter 6
DARCOM Safety Manual Chapters 7 and 8
DARCOM Safety Manual Appendices A and B
DARCOM Safety Manual Appendices C and D
DARCOM Safety Manual Appendices E and F
DARCOM Safety Manual Appendices G, H and I

The files are large but well worth reading.

DARCOM Safety Manual on Handling Depleted Uranium 385-1.1-78
in PDF Format

US Army Research Lab reports on Depleted Uranium

The following files all pertain to the US Army Research Lab and testing of Depleted Uranium munitions.

US ARL Manual on Bioassay Program
US ARL Manual on Radiation Protection Program
US ARL Manual on Radiation Protection Program
US ARL Manual on Radiation Protection
US ARL Manual on Environmental Monitoring
US ARL Environmental Assessment for DU
US Army Research Lab/Aberdeen Proving Ground Application for Renewal of DU License

US Army Research Lab reports on Depleted Uranium

22nd SUPCOM Logs on Camp Doha fire

These logs, and the serious questions they raise should have been addressed by OSAGWI, or at least by the Presidential Special Oversight Board. Both organizations blew it by ignoring these veterans.

These logs show a minimum of the following:

The 22nd SUPCOM logs can also be found in the End Notes section of OSAGWI’s Environmental Exposure report on DU at:

http://www.gulflink.osd.mil/du/du_refs/n21en206/8071_032_0000001.htm

The logs actually show staff at Camp Doha informing 22nd SUPCOM about DU rounds cooking off (log entry 14), and a three star general traveling to the site after the fire started (log item 18).

Log entry 31 shows the first acknowledgment of DU being a hazard, to include a respiratory hazard, and entry 32 shows Army Central Command calling for downwind predictions of the fallout with acknowledgment of that order received by Camp Doha.

Entry 34 is proof that Camp Doha was aware of the hazard since LTC Smith acknowledged receiving the order to start an “alpha damage assessment”, proof that is confirmed by the response in entry 42 in which the Regiment at Camp Doha responded saying they had no airborne monitoring capability, and that they were looking for radiation detection devices.

Entry 44 shows a team headed by a Colonel was located that could perform the “airborne radiation” monitoring, and they were to report to SUPCOM for transportation to Camp Doha.

Entry 56 requires thorough explanation of why “Bill Shirley”, identified as the SUPCOM Safety Officer, wanted to keep “news of radiation out of the press”. This entry shows a very chilling effect on information on the hazards of DU from that moment on since the only other entries mentioning the DU hazard are 129 and 131, over 12 hours later, in which containers are requested for disposal of DU fragments.

Entry 109 shows a visit to the site by the Army Safety Board from Ft. Rucker, but there is no explanation to date about why they never raised an alarm of unprotected soldiers being exposed to this “airborne radiation” safety hazard, and no After Action reports from ANY organization involved have been provided to explain the situation. 

A possible explanation for “Mr. Shirley’s” comments is contained in entries 123 and 133. These entries show the significant actions taken by Command staff in obtaining video of the incident, then getting a copy to the Office of the Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs. This shows the Camp Doha incident was treated as a PR nightmare rather than a health hazard nightmare. I have requested this video and other information under the Freedom of Information Act, and have received no response. 

A response I have received after requesting the 22nd SUPCOM logs show a serious problem much the same as the missing CENTCOM NBC logs. In the response I received, and in the logs posted to GulfLink, log entries 71 through 104 are missing, entries that would have been made at the height of the incident. Another case of missing Command operations logs that may have shed light on why so many soldiers were exposed to an airborne radiation hazard.

22nd SUPCOM Logs on Camp Doha fire

Statement of Chris Kornkven
at the 4th Annual NGWRC Conference
Medically Significant Health Effects of DU Exposure

This statement shows a number of contradictions in positions taken by the VA and DOD on DU Exposures during the Gulf War. The statement contains actual images of some of the NRC data obtained through FOIA, the 12 test results of some veterans from the 144th S&S Company (Col. Bob Cherrie previously stated all 27 tested negative), and the Camp Doha logs received through FOIA. The logs show there were warnings sent to Camp Doha, warnings that were acknowledged, and also show the DOD treating the incident as a PR nightmare rather than a health hazard.

The logs, and the FOIA response provided, also show there are very significant portions of the logs missing, much the same as the CENTCOM NBC logs.

Statement of Chris Kornkven
at the 4th Annual NGWRC Conference
Medically Significant Health Effects of DU Exposure

Briefing Slides from secret meeting of Presidential Special Oversight Board

Here are the briefing slides used by the Office of the Special Assistant for Gulf War Illnesses when they attended a secret meeting of the Presidential Special Oversight Board in July 1998. Not only was the unannounced meeting a violation of the law, but according to the cover letter received with the FOIA response (briefing slides), the law was further violated by the failure to keep a transcript of the meeting.

Briefing Slides from secret meeting of Presidential Special Oversight Board

The Fear of Falling

Another very excellent report on depleted uranium by Mr. Dan Fahey. This report includes observations on the OSAGWI and RAND reports, as well as comments on the use of DU in Kosovo. This report also inlcudes many comments on interviews by OSAGWI of soldiers exposed to DU, yet never fully discussed in their Environmental Exposure report. The interviews are provided here for your viewing.

The Fear of Falling

Report on the International Conference on Low-Level Radiation

A review by Mr. Dan Fahey of the recent International Conference on Low-Level Radiation Injury and Medical Countermeasures.  This conference, sponsored by the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI), examined radiation health effects and possible treatments for radiation injury, and included a section on depleted uranium.  Scientists from around the world attended, representing militaries, private industry, and government agencies.  

Report on the International Conference on Low-Level Radiation

UN Environmental Report on Kosovo

Assessment of the Environmental Impact of Military Activities During the Yugoslavia Conflict

Preliminary Findings, June 1999
Prepared by:
The Regional Environmental Center for Central and Eastern Europe

Prepared for:
European Commission DG-XI - Environment, Nuclear Safety and Civil Protection

A good report on the environmental effects of the war in Kosovo. The report includes information concerning depleted uranium.

UN Environmental Report on Kosovo

DU Fact Sheet for Kosovo

This Fact Sheet is provided for the many individuals who will be going into Kosovo or have stayed in Kosovo. Considering there are children that are playing on tanks and other vehicles that were destroyed by NATO, it is possible that some of them were hit by DU rounds and could be contaminated.

DU Fact Sheet for Kosovo

DOD Analysis II An Analysis of the RAND report on Depleted Uranium by Dan Fahey

This report, in PDF format, is a very good review of the recently released RAND report on Depleted Uranium. This report by Dan Fahey, shows just how much information RAND ignored when they conducted their supposedly thorough review of the available medical literature. Mr. Fahey lists more than 173 reports that have been cited in other reports on Depleted Uranium, but RAND failed to review.

DOD Analysis II An Analysis of the RAND report on Depleted Uranium by Dan Fahey

Presidential Special Oversight Analysis of OSAGWI Environmental Exposure Report on Depleted Uranium

This report clearly shows why Bernard Rostker must resign as head of the DOD's investigation into Gulf War Illnesses.

A few quotes from the analysis:

1. "The interim Depleted Uranium (DU) exposure report does not demonstrate adequate support for its bottom line conclusion."
2. "Many individuals who were potentially exposed have not been clinically evaluated."
3. "Exposure assessments are incomplete and misleading"
4. "Toxicity assessments are incomplete"
5. "Dr. Mcdiarmid (VA), in a memo sent to OSAGWI, commented that, "Very important modifiers of the general results of our findings continue to be left out of the OSAGWI summaries; and trends that are observed by the Baltimore group are wrongly summarized as cut and dried by the drafters of these OSAGWI documents"
6. "The report is not clearly written"
7. "The report contains contradictory information"

Presidential Special Oversight Analysis of OSAGWI Environmental Exposure Report on Depleted Uranium

Nuclear Regulatory Commission on DU hazards dated 1966

This information is from a FOIA request to the NRC for information concerning DU. What the NGWRC received was over 17,000+ pages of information showing how significant is the knowledge of the NRC and the DOD on hazards associated with depleted uranium, spanning from 1961 to 1997. This information shows how much data has been aquired pertaining to test firing depleted uranium munitions since 1958. Aerosolization data, air sampling, resuspension, protective measures, medical measures and data.

One of these pages was provided to OSAGWI when they released the RAND report on DU, which was promptly ignored with the statement that "this page speaks only to uranium and thorium". The subject line clearly indicates it also concerns depleted uranium.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission on DU hazards dated 1966

General Accounting Office investigation of Depleted Uranium Exposures during and after the Gulf War

This investigation was requested by US Senator Russell Feingold. As you can see, the study will provide: "review and make recommendations on research on the health effects of Depleted Uranium" "training our troops on DU exposure" "current or planned anti-armor alternatives to depleted uranium"

General Accounting Office investigation of Depleted Uranium Exposures during and after the Gulf War

Comments from the Department of Defense to
General Accounting Office report
Operation Desert Storm: Army Not Adequately Prepared to Deal with Depleted Uranium Contamination

Please view the 1993 report from the GAO in which the DOD agreed with the GAO that training should be provided to soldiers who may encounter DU on the battlefield.
It is now almost 7 years after this report, and the training has not yet been implemented to any degree.

Comments from the Department of Defense to
General Accounting Office report
Operation Desert Storm: Army Not Adequately Prepared to Deal with Depleted Uranium Contamination

Aberdeen Proving Ground Test Facility for DU Munitions

Please check out this information from the Aberdeen Test facility for DU munitions. A picture of the SUPERBOX is included, along with pictures of individuals involved in testing DU munitions that appear to have taken significant protective measures simply for firing the munitions. Quite a contrast with the DOD position that guidance and regulations in effect during the Gulf War was "too stringent".

Aberdeen Proving Ground Test Facility for DU Munitions

Depleted Uranium Case Narrative (First Edition)

This First Edition Narrative is a joint project between the National Gulf War Resource Center, Swords to Plowshares and the
Military Toxics Project.

Depleted Uranium Case Narrative (First Edition)
206Kb of Rich Text Format files in zip format

Depleted Uranium Case Narative, 3rd Edition
Author: Dan Fahey

Please read the most comprehensive report available on Depleted Uranium Exposures during the Gulf War. This report is 285 + pages with more than 550 footnotes referencing government documents used in researching the report. The first edition of this report is what forced OSAGWI to finally release their Environmental Exposure Report on DU, many months after first saying they would do so.
An index of the report:
1. Cover Page
2. Table of Contents
3. Executive Summary
4. Crew members in vehicles struck by depleted
uranium penetrators.
5. Recovery and Maintenance Personnel
6. The Depleted Uranium Assessment Team
7. Personnel present at the July, 1991 fire at Doha,
Kuwait.
8. Medical personnel
9. Abrams Tank Crews
10. Ammunition Handlers
11. Populations in Kuwait, Iraq, and Saudi Arabia
12. Tab A How You Can Help
13. Tab B Selected Documents
14. Tab C The Freedom of Information Act
15. Tab D Bibliography

Depleted Uranium Case Narative, 3rd Edition

832 Kb in PDF Format

Uranium Battlefields:
At Home and Abroad

Author: Damacio Lopez

One of the very first reports to come out concerning depleted uranium exposures during the Gulf War.

Uranium Battlefields:
At Home and Abroad

1.7Mb PDF file in zip format

Jefferson Proving Ground Environmental Assessment 
in PDF Format

This Environmental Assessment was conducted as a part of the Base Realignment and Closure process as required. The report clearly shows the difference between the DOD reporting to another federal agency (and having to comply with federal law) and the DOD providing information to vets.

A quote from the report:

"Radiological Survey- Depleted Uranium Impact Area: 2,000 acres with ~ 75,000 kilograms of DU in soil."

Please read the report, and then ask yourself,
"why does the DOD have better inhalation dose rate data on deer than they will admit to having on soldiers?"
"When will an accurate dose assessment model be available for soldiers?"

Jefferson Proving Ground Environmental Assessment
in PDF format.

Soil Sampling

At one time, I have FOIA'd information on Soil Sampling that Bernard Rostker has reported taking place in the Gulf since the end of the Gulf War. This Soil Sampling is in relation to Depleted Uranium and how much is spread around Saudi Arabia and Kuwait.
This information has not been supplied to me through the FOIA process. The DOD is so far ignoring that request by sending documents that do not pertain to the request. Considering OSAGWI is one of the copied organizations, they should have an idea of how to comply with the request.

Soil Sampling

TACOM FOIA

This FOIA is an April 1998 Environmental Assessment report on new DU armor for the Abrams Tank. The report was issued THREE MONTHS prior to OSAGWI's release of their Environmental Exposure report.
This Assessment report, while only 36 pages, contains a good deal of information about depleted uranium and the hazards associated with it. This FOIA includes dose amounts for the Abrams crewmen including the driver, as well as information on contamination from DU penetrators. It also references guidelines that OSA/GWI now says is too stringent, and recommends proper breathing protection and clothing when in a DU contaminated area. Other references are to the very same documents as used in our NGWRC DU Case Narrative.
It also shows that OSAGWI again got it wrong in their Environmental Exposure report. In their report, they state soldiers can be exposed to the same amounts of radiation (500 mrem) as radiation workers who have had extensive training on radiation hazards. This report states the facts, that the Army considers soldiers as "members of the general public" when it comes to exposures, and our exposures should be limited to 100 mrem.

TACOM FOIA
in Rich Text Format.

81 Pages of information pertaining to Depleted Uranium during the Gulf War.

This zip file is 2.1 Mb in size, but well worth requesting. These documents include memorandums showing the knowledge of the DU hazard, as well as TB 9-1300-278. This Technical Bulletin provides guidance on hazards such as depleted uranium. This guidance was in place during the Gulf War....and at Camp Doha. This guidance is now considered "too stringent" by the DOD.

81 Pages of information pertaining to Depleted Uranium during the Gulf War.
These files have been removed to make room for more information. If you would like to receive these files, please send me a note requesting the DUTeam.zip files.

Depleted Uranium: The Stone Unturned

A report on the exposures of Persian Gulf War Veterans and Others to Depleted Uranium Contamination.
March 28, 1997
Dan Fahey
Swords to Plowshares
Check out these pages. Dan has written a very good report concerning the exposures of Gulf vets to DU in the Gulf, and has included a number of references to "official" reports on Depleted Uranium.

Depleted Uranium: The Stone Unturned
These pages have been removed to make room for new information. If you would like to receive these pages, please send me a note requesting The Stone Unturned.

DU Regulations

AR 11-9 Army Radiation Safety Program

A significant victory for Gulf War veterans. Army Regulations were changed in June 1995 (see below) specifically excluding soldiers from the regulation. Those deployed to Bosnia and Kosovo where DU has been used would have been excluded from medical testing. There was no authority allowing DoD to exclude soldiers from safety and protective measures under federal law governing  radioactive waste such as DU, so the regulation had to be changed. 

AR 11-9 Army Radiation Safety Program

AR 40-14 Control and Recording Procedures for Exposure to Ionizing Radiation and Radioactive Materials May 1982

Here are excerpts of the May 1982 version of Army Regulation 40-14. Notice there are NO references to excluding soldiers from medical care and testing after exposure to Depleted Uranium. The June 1995 version below specifically lists DU when excluding soldiers, so the change was implemented solely to absolve DOD officials from responsibility for the soldiers health effects resulting from exposure to DU on the battlefield.

AR 40-14 Control and Recording Procedures for Exposure to Ionizing Radiation and Radioactive Materials May 1982

AR 40-14  Occupational Ionizing Radiation Personnel Dosimetry

Below is the current version (June 1995) of Army Regulation 40-14, "Occupational Ionizing Radiation Personnel Dosimetry".

Since OSA/GWI mistakenly believes DU contamination does not cause medical effects in Gulf War vets from ingestion of DU particulate, Why did they change this regulation in 1995 to specifically exclude military members from medical care  from DU contamination? Was this regulation changed to exclude military officials from liability for future exposures?

to quote the regulation from page i:

a . In particular, this regulation remains applicable to DA and DLA personnel de-ployed on either humanitarian or peacekeep-ing missions where the degree of readiness to respond to hostile fire requires the availabil-ity of  radioactive commodities, such as de-pleted uranium ammunition, as a contingency.
b. This regulation does NOT apply to the following:
(1) Personnel exposed to ionizing radiation and radioactive materials resulting from the use of ionizing radiation  sources and devices in geographical areas or zones where—
(a) Hostile fire or combat already exists or is strongly anticipated to occur, or
(b) Combat missions are intentionally go-ing to be conducted by Department of De-fense personnel.

Notice that DA and DLA civilians are still covered.

AR 40-14  Occupational Ionizing Radiation Personnel Dosimetry
in PDF format

Title 10CFR20 Subpart D—Radiation Dose Limits for Individual Members of the Public

When reading Army Regulations or other DOD documents concerning Depleted Uranium, many cite Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations as containing limits on exposure.
Please read this section of Title 10 and ask yourself:

How can AR 40-14 be changed to exclude soldiers from medical care for conditions resulting from DU exposure?
Why does OSA/GWI consider soldiers "occupational workers" when it comes to exposure limits when soldiers ARE NOT given training and protective measures as required under Title 10?

Title 10CFR20 Subpart D—Radiation Dose Limits for Individual Members of the Public
in PDF format

DU Quotes

Marine Corps Memo concerning DU used as training rounds in Gulf

This September 1990 memo shows the Marine Corps needed to use DU rounds to train with in the Gulf prior to the start of the Gulf War. The memo acknowledges that a health hazard existed from firing DU, and that authorization to fire the rounds for training had to be obtained not only through MARCENT, but from CINCCENT as well.

Marine Corps Memo concerning DU used as training rounds in Gulf

Bernard Rostker Speech to American Legion, 23 Mar 98

This is a speech Bernard Rostker gave to the American Legion in September 1998, and the Legion has supported him since. The Legion's lead person on Gulf War issues has known of medical effects of DU exposure for some time having attended the November 1997 Gulf War Expert Scientific Committee Meeting in which Dr. McDiarmid related her medically significant health findings, yet the Legion has done nothing but lead cheers for OSAGWI.

Please read this speech, I have added extensive comments throughout the speech, with links to many documments showing the contradictions.

Bernard Rostker Speech to American Legion, 23 Mar 98

Bernard Rostker Speech to American Legion, 8 Sep 98

As if the Legion didn't hear enough about how well OSAGWI has researched DU and discounted reports from veterans, here is another speech by Rostker to the Legion in which the health effects have been minimized and ignored.

A quote from the speech:
"The best current information suggests that the actual exposure to depleted uranium during the Gulf War was not medically significant. Another more temperate version interpretation of that statement was suggested in a recent letter from the American Legion’s Persian Gulf Task Force which says, "The American Legion is awaiting the completion of the ongoing research agenda before it will concur with definitive statements regarding the causes of Gulf War Illnesses. We (the American Legion) acknowledge, however, that the available scientific evidence weighs against DU as a likely risk factor for GWI." I certainly, concur in the position of the American Legion, both that research should go on, and what the available scientific evidence is telling us."

The Legions Persian Gulf Task Force Director was in the meeting April 15th, 1999 when Bernard Rostker was asked if he would now call for new medical research into reproductive, neurological and respiratory effects of DU exposure, in response to the recommendations from the RAND report. Bernard Rostker stated "No" and "its not needed".

When will the American Legion start advocating for veterans?

Bernard Rostker Speech to American Legion, 8 Sep 98

Los Alamos Memo

This memo, issued by LTC Ziehmn of Los Alamos appears to have set the tone for DOD's actions concerning depleted uranium since we came home from the Gulf War.

A quote from the memo:

"If dU penetrators proved their worth during our recent combat acitivities, then we should assure their future existence (until something better is developed) through Service/DOD proponency. If proponency is not garnered, it is possible that we stand to lose a valuable combat capability.

I believe we should keep this sensitive issue at mind when after action reports are written."

Los Alamos Memo

I have had a lot of help from Dan Fahey of Swords to Plowshares in gathering this information....Thanks Dan.
A few quotes that Dan compiled.....

Pre-Desert Storm Reports

"Aerosol DU exposures to soldiers on the battlefield could be significant with potential radiological and toxicological effects" (Science and Applications International Corporation (SAIC), Kinetic EnergyPenetrator Environment and Health Considerations, July 1990 Vol. 1, 4-5: (included as Appendix D in US Army Armament, Munitions and Chemical Command report Kinetic Energy Penetrator Long Term Strategy Study, July 1990).

"Under combat conditions, the most exposed individuals are probably the ground troops that re-enter a battlefield following the exchange of armor-piercing munitions, either on foot or motorized transports." (SAIC, July 1990, Vol 2, 3-4)

"We are simply highlighting the potential for levels of [DU] exposure to military personnel during combat that would be unnacceptable during peacetime operations."(SAIC, July 1990, Vol 1, 4-5)

"Following combat, however, the conditions of the battlefield, and the long-term health risks to natives and combat veterans may become issues in the acceptability of the continued use of DU kinetic energy penetrators for military applications." (SAIC, July 1990, Vol 2, 3-4)

Depleted Uranium is a"low level alpha radiation emitter which is linked to cancer when exposures are internal, [and] chemical toxicity causing kidney damage."(SAIC, July 1990, Vol 1, 2-2)

"Short term effects of high doses can result in death, while long term effects of low doses have been implicated in cancer." (SAIC, July 1990, Vol 1, 4-12)

"Personnel in or near (less than approximately 50 meters) an armored vehicle at the time these vehicles were struck by depleted uranium munitions could receive significant internal DU exposures (i.e. those in excess of allowable standards)." (Statement of Col. Eric Daxon, Radiation Protection Staff Officer, US Army Medical Command, summarizing the results of a December 1989 report from the Ballistic Research Laboratory, Radiological Contamination From Impacted Abrams Heavy Armor. Fliszar. et. al., Col. Daxon's statement was made in a July 19, 1996 letter to Dan Fahey, Swords to Plowshares).

"Our conclusion regarding the health and environmental acceptability of DU penetrators assume both controlled use and the presence of excellent health physics management practices. Combat conditions will lead to the uncontrolled release of DU. Individuals consulted have generally responded to this issue by saying it is irrelevant, or insignificant compared to the other risks of combat. However, environmental issues will arise if DU is used in combat." (SAIC, July 1990, Vol 1, 4-5)

Post Desert Storm Reports

"There has been and continues to be a concern regarding the impact of DU on the environment. Therefore, if no one makes a case for the effectiveness of DU on the battlefield, DU rounds may become politically unacceptable and thus, be deleted from the arsenal....I believe we should keep this sensitive issue at mind when after action reports are written." (LTC M.V. Ziehmn, Los Alamos National Laboratory memorandum, March 1, 1991).

"When DU is indicted as a causitive agent for Desert Storm illness, the Army must have sufficient data to separate fiction from reality. Without forethought and data, the financial implications of long-term disability payments and health-care costs would be excessive." (US Army Environmental Policy Institute (AEPI). Health and Environmental Consequences of Depleted Uranium Use in the US Army: Technical Report. June 1995, p. 4).

"US service personnel also could have been exposed to DU if they inhaled or ingested DU dust particles during incidental contact with vehicles destroyed by DU munitions, or if they lived or worked in areas contaminated with DU dust from accidental munitions fires. Thus, unnecessary exposure of many individuals could have occured." (Presidential Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses (PAC), Final Report, December 1996, p.99)

"Army officals believe that DU protective methods can be ignored during battle and other life-threatening situations because DU-related health risks are greatly outweighed by the risks of combat." (US General Accounting Office, Operation Desert Storm: Army Not Adequately Prepared to Deal With Depleted Uranium Contamination, GAO/NSAID-93-90, January 1993, p.4).

"Soldiers may be incidentally exposed to DU from dust and smoke on the battlefield. The Army Surgeon General has determined that it is unlikely that these soldiers will receive a significant internal DU exposure. Medical follow-up is not warranted for soldiers who experience incidental exposure from dust or smoke." (AEPI, June 1995. p. 102)

"Since DU weapons are openly available on the world arms market, DU weapons will be used in future conflicts....The number of DU patients on future battlefields probably will be significantly higher because other countries will use systems containing DU." (AEPI, June 1995. p. 119-120)

"DU is a low-level radioactive waste, and, therefore, must be disposed of in a licensed repository." (AEPI, June 1995. p. 154)

"No international law, treaty, regulation, or custom requires the United States to remediate the Persian Gulf War battlefields." (AEPI, June 1995. p. 154)

"Depleted uranium is more of a problem than we thought when it was developed. But it was developed according to standards and was thought through very carefully. It turned out perhaps to be wrong." (Brent Scowcroft, former National Security Advisor to President Bush, from a British documentary titled "Riding the Storm," which aired on ITN TV, CH. 4, in the United Kingdom on January 3, 1996).

 

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